My name is Kai (like Okay not like Pie) .20. Cosplayer in the Toronto Area. Nerdfighter. Pottermore: BronzeMist112 Multi-Shipper. Gender: Fuck that noise Pronouns: Xe, Ze, She, He, so all The Boyfriend  Readers Reading

 

hellotailor:

astolat:

limnetic:

Marvel, an MCU fanvid by lim
Music: Festivo by Keiichi Suzuki

—thanks to Speranza, Astolat, and Kate Bolin x [124mb HD DL]

OK guys, do yourselves a favor and GO WATCH THIS INSTANTLY and I defy you not to chair dance with it. \o/ SO AWESOME. ALL THE AWESOME. 

THIS FANVID IS AMAZING. <3333 Lim.

thepondsaregone:

thorinoakenbutt:

castielandpie:

poryqon:

it bothers me that Kansas and Arkansas are not pronounced the same

I’m from the UK and I have been pronouncing Arkansas as Ar-Kansas my whole life

For all my non-american friends, Arkansas is pronounced ark-an-saw

WHAT

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

mondegreener:

on our WWII quiz one of the questions was “how many estimated deaths came from World War II?” and i put “at least 12” and my teacher marked it correct

Me: Heyyyy baby *hugs cat*

Cat: *paws me*

Cat: *bites me*

Cat: *kicks me*

Cat: *scratches me*

Cat: *runs away immediately*

Me:

Me: *looks down the bleeding hands*

Me: Cats are

Me: the best

Anonymous asked
I need some advice? Uh, so I'm kind of a big deal (I have a reputation to hold up, I'm kind of like a huge jock) except I really like this girl. I met her new years at this party (we sang some karaoke it was embarrasing I guess) but that's not the point. There's this musical at my school and she wants us to do it together (again reputation) and I know I'd enjoy it esp w her but then there's also this blonde chick and her gay brother who I'm pretty sure both have crushes on me and what do I do?

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

Do what makes you happy. Trust me. After high school, you’re going to deeply regret it if you look back and remember that you let the fear of your “reputation” hinder you from doing things you enjoy. At the end of the day, what ignorant bullshit people think or say about you does not matter. You HAVE to be yourself. You HAVE to participate in activities that make you HAPPY. Do not, PLEASE, do NOT hold yourself back from being the amazing person you can be, or participating in activities you love, or dating a person you like, all just because you are worried about a certain image you feel pressured to maintain. Don’t sacrifice any part of yourself for others. True friends will like you for you, accept you for you, and after high school is all said and done, whatever your “reputation” once was, won’t matter anymore… 

wait

ghostypajamas:

nonbinary people who are okay with gendered pronouns/names are still nonbinary and if a nonbinary person tells you they’re okay with gendered pronouns then it’s really not your place to say that their gender identity is less valid because of that, even if you yourself are nonbinary. Gender is different for everyone and there’s no “valid way” to be a certain gender the only validation you need is your own.

(Source: rairatrio)